Drinking Water

Definition and quality requirements

Drinking water is defined as water which is intended for human consumption. According to the European directive 98/83/EC from 1998, drinking water is "all water either in its original state or after treatment, intended for drinking, cooking, food preparation […]” (Article 2, 1., (a)). This results in high quality requirements which Xylem can help with. In terms of this quality, the directive lists microbiological, chemical and indicator parameters as contributing factors. A main objective is, "to protect human health by ensuring that it [the drinking water] is wholesome and clean.“ (Article 1, 2.).

  • Usage

    What’s the usage of drinking water?
    Besides the above mentioned usage, the following topics are also relevant as drinking water applications:

    1. Body care and cleansing
    2. Cleaning of goods intended to be in contact with food
    3. Cleaning of goods intended to be in contact with the human body
    4. All water in any food-production processing facility, undertaking for the manufacture, processing, preservation or marketing of products or substances intended for human consumption

    According to the directive 98/83/EC (Article 3, 1.), drinking water excludes:

    1. “natural mineral water […] in accordance to […] 80/777/EEC […]”
    2. “waters which are medicinal products within […] 65/65/EEC […]”
  • Threshold values

    Where are the threshold values for drinking water?
    Threshold values were defined for a range of parameters. They are divided into microbiological, chemical, and indicator parameters. One of the most common ones are nitrate and chloride. The associated thresholds are 50 mg/l and 250 mg/l, respectively. The full lists can be visited under this link (ANNEX I, parts A to C).
    If thresholds are not met, drinking water is not allowed to be provided. The associated authorities/relevant bodies must then take remedial actions or put in place restrictions to its use.

  • Drinking water production and treatment

    Where does drinking water come from?
    The most common sources of drinking water are groundwater (wells) or surface waters (lakes/rivers). Usually, both waters need to be treated, as the quality requirements for drinking water are higher than for ground or surface waters. Depending on the quality of the raw water, a corresponding expense has to be invested into the treatment. Among others, the latter includes filtration and disinfection with chlorine

  • Drinking water monitoring

    How to monitor drinking water
    Frequency and the extent of drinking water monitoring depends on the size of the supplied area and the monitored parameter. In general, larger drinking water plants have to be monitored more often. For example, in a supplied area of 500m³/day, conductivity has to be monitored once a year. A detailed presentation can be found here (ANNEX II, Table B1). Independent of this mandatory minimum surveillance, waterworks are usually monitoring their water quality continuously. Besides the monitoring, these continuous measurements also enable a control of the single processes.

Monitors, Panels and Analyzer

Multiparameter panels

Multiparameter panels

To monitor chlorine, pH/ORP, conductivity and turbidity 

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Analog transmitters for single parameters

Analog transmitters for single parameters

To monitor chlorine, pH/ORP, conductivity or O2 

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Chlorine Analyzer

Chlorine Analyzer

To monitor chlorine according to DPD 

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Analyzer Turb 2000

Analyzer Turb 2000

To monitor turbidity in drinking water – ultrasonic cleaning as option 

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Sensors

pH Electrodes and Sensors

pH Electrodes and Sensors

Analog sensors for connection to pH 298 and MULTILINE 1000 for measurements of pH and ORP in drinking water 

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Conductivity Sensors

Conductivity Sensors

Analog sensors for connection to LF 298 and MULTILINE 1000 for measurements of conductivity in drinking water 

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Free and Total Chlorine Sensors

Free and Total Chlorine Sensors

Analog sensors for connection to Cl 298 and MULTILINE 1000 for measurements of free or total chlorine in drinking water 

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Oxygen Sensors

Oxygen Sensors

Analog sensors for connection to Oxi 298 and MULTILINE 1000 for measurements of dissolved oxygen in drinking water 

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Information about Drinking Water

Get the information about the application drinking water from this page as free-of-charge pdf. 

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Brochure Drinking Water Monitoring

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